OFFICE of SURFACE MINING
RECLAMATION and ENFORCEMENT

U.S. Department of the Interior

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Did You Know...

The U.S. holds the world's largest estimated recoverable reserves of coal, and is a net exporter of coal.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/


U.S. first quarter 2013 coal exports (31.8 million short tons) rose 13.7% above fourth quarter 2012 coal exports (28.0 million short tons).
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During 2013, U.S. coal exports to European markets accounted for 52.8% of exports.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During 2013, U.S. coal exports to Asian markets accounted for 28.0%.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During the first quarter of 2013, the top ten destinations for U.S. coal exports were the Netherlands, China, United Kingdom, Brazil, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, France, and Germany.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During the first quarter of 2013, the average price of U.S. coal exports was $99.68 per short ton.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During the first quarter of 2013, U.S. steam coal exports totaled 13.7 million short tons (6.6% higher than fourth quarter 2012).
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During the first quarter of 2013, U.S. metallurgical coal exports totaled 18.2 million short tons (19.6% higher than fourth quarter 2012).Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


During the first quarter of 2013, U.S. coal stocks fell to 221.9 million short tons from 239.9 million short tons at the end of fourth quarter 2012, a 7.5% decline.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/


In 2013, U.S. coal is mined in 25 states. Wyoming mines the most U.S. coal, followed by West Virginia, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Texas.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/


In 2013, U.S. coal is the most common fuel for generating electricity in the United States.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/


In August 2013, the U.S. coal total monthly production was 90.83 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/news_markets/monthly.cfm?src=Coal-f3


In August 2103, the monthly U.S. coal production for the Northern Appalachia was 10.746 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/news_markets/eastern_prod.cfm


In August 2103, the monthly U.S. coal production for the Central Appalachia was 12.306 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/news_markets/eastern_prod.cfm


In August 2103, the monthly U.S. coal production for the Illinois Basin was 11.226 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/news_markets/eastern_prod.cfm


In 2013, about 44% of the U.S. coal produced is subbituminous coal.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


In 2013, Wyoming is the leading source of subbituminous coal.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Total U.S. coal production in the first half of 2013 was 21 million tons, or 4%, lower than in the same period of 2012.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=12271


During the first four months of 2013, U.S. coal imports dropped 0.5 million tons year-on-year.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=12271


In 2013, bituminous coal is the most abundant rank of coal found in the U.S. accounting for about half of U.S. coal production.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


In 2013, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania are the largest producers of bituminous coal.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


From fiscal year 2003 to 2012, annual sales of U.S. coal produced from federal and Indian lands ranged between 458 million and 509 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=12431


In 2012, U.S. coal mines produced more than a billion short tons of U.S. coal, and more than 81% of this U.S. coal was used by U.S. power plants to generate electricity.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/


Coal is a fossil fuel and is the altered remains of prehistoric vegetation that originally accumulated in swamps and peat bogs.
Source: http://www.worldcoal.org/coal/what-is-coal/


U.S. Coal is classified into four types (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite), depending on the amounts and types of carbon it contains and amount of heat energy produced.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Anthracite coal contains 86-97% carbon, and generally has a heating value slightly higher than bituminous coal. It accounts for less than 0.5% of the coal mined in the United States.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


All of the anthracite coal mines in the U.S. are located in northeastern Pennsylvania.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Bituminous coal contains 45-86% carbon. Bituminous coal was formed under high heat and pressure.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Bituminous coal in the U.S. is between 100 and 300 million years old.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Bituminous coal is used to generate electricity and is an important fuel and raw material for the steel and iron industries.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Subbituminous coal has a lower heating value than bituminous coal.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Subbituminous coal typically contains 35-45% carbon.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Most subbituminous coal in the U.S. is at least 100 million years old.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Lignite coal is the lowest rank of coal with the lowest energy content.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


Lignite coal deposits in the U.S. tend to be relatively young coal, containing 25%-35% carbon.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


In 2013, there are 20 lignite coal mines in the U.S. producing about 7% of the total U.S. coal.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


In 2013, most U.S. lignite coal is mined in Texas and North Dakota.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


In 2013, U.S. lignite coal is mainly burned at power plants to generate electricity.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_home


In 2013, the most serious impact of U.S. underground mining may be the methane gas that has to be vented out of mines to make the mines safe to work in.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_environment


In 2013, U.S. surface mining (including mountain top removal) is used to produce most of the coal in the U.S. because it is less expensive than underground mining.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_mining


U.S. surface mining can be used when coal is buried less than 200 feet underground.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_mining


As of January 1, 2012, the recoverable reserves at producing U.S. mines were 19.2 billion short tons. (One short ton is 2,000 pounds).
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_reserves


The revenue collected by the U.S. federal government from the sale of U.S. coal from federal and Indian lands within Wyoming ranged from a low of $303 million in FY2003 to a high of $638 million in FY2012.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=12431


In 2011, the U.S. estimated recoverable coal reserves represent enough coal to last 236 years.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=coal_reserves


In 2011, U.S. coal production increased slightly from 2010, driven by export demand, to roughly 1.1 billion short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, productive capacity of U.S. coal mines increased by 2.5 million short tons to 1.3 billion short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, the average number of employees in U.S. coal mines increased 6.3 percent to 91,611.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


Between 2007 – 2011 there was an average of 54,395 U.S. persons employed in underground U.S. mining
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/#employment


Between 2007 – 2011 there was an average of 37,087 U.S. persons employed in surface mining
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/#employment


In 2011, the average sale price of U.S. coal increased 15.2 percent to $41.01 per short ton.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, 1,325 total coal mines produced 1,095,628 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


During 2011, in OSMRE’s Northern Appalachian Region, 348 U.S. coal mines produced 132,133 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


During 2011, in OSMRE’s Central Appalachian Region, 741 coal mines produced 184,813 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


During 2011, in OSMRE’s Southern Appalachian Region, 52 coal mines produced 19,071 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


During 2011, in OSMRE’s Illinois Basin Region, 77 coal mines produced 116,032 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


During 2011, in OSMRE’s Powder River Basin Region, 16 coal mines produced 462,400 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, total U.S. coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 12.1 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, total U.S. coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.3 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, underground U.S. coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 53,852 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, underground U.S. coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 291,753 thousand short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, across all 25 states, 525,996 thousand short tons of bituminous coal were produced.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, across all 25 U.S. coal mining states, 486,296 thousand tons of subbituminous coal were produced.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, across all 25 U.S. coal mining states, 81,101 thousand tons of lignite coal were produced.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, across all 25 U.S. coal mining states, 2,235 thousand tons of anthracite coal were produced.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, in terms of productive capacity of U.S. coal mines, West Virginia has 60,246 thousand tons categorized as at the surface.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/annual/


In 2011, U.S. domestic coal consumption of metallurgical coal by the coking industry rose 1.6 percent to 21.4 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/data.cfm#consumption


In 2011, the amount of coal produced at U.S. coal mines was 1,094.3 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/


In 2011, 42% of the country's nearly 4 trillion kilowatt hours of electricity used U.S. coal as its source of energy.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/


In 2011, U.S. domestic coal consumption of metallurgical coal by the coking industry rose 1.6 percent to 21.4 million short tons.
Source: http://www.eia.gov/coal/

Page Last Modified/Reviewed: 4/4/14

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